History

OUR FIRM THROUGH THE YEARS


Advocating for the industry is important to us at Architects DCA. Toon Dreessen, President of Architects DCA is a strong voice for a range of issues including supporting local firms, the value of association memberships, the importance of political engagement, and pushing for good design in the face of the procurement model.

1976-1989: Marcus Berns Architect and Inc. (1986)
Marcus Berns left the Montreal firm of Mayers, Girvan, Wellen and Berns, where he was a principal and started as a sole practitioner in Ottawa in 1976. Marcus also did work as The Berns-Jooste Partnership with Johan K. Joost.
1989-1999: Berns Farrow Architects Inc.
James (Jim) Farrow becomes a principal in the new firm. He is Vice-President, Marcus Berns remains President.
1999-2012: Farrow Architects Inc.
Deborah (Debbie) Levine Farrow becomes a principal in the new firm. Marcus Berns leaves the firm, moves to Toronto and becomes a sculptor. Deborah is Vice-President, James becomes President of the new firm.
2012-2015: Farrow Dreessen Architect Inc.
Toon Dreessen merges his firm with Farrow Architects to create a new firm. James remains President, Toon and Deborah are Vice-Presidents. All three are principals in the new firm.
2016: FARROW DREESSEN ARCHITECTS BECOMES ARCHITECTS DCA.
Toon Dreessen advocates passionately for changes in architecture procurement, and the firm pursues work that sensitively reflects geography and social context, ultimately contributing long-term cultural value to the urban landscape.
2005-2012: Dreessen Architect (& inc.)
Toon Dreessen starts Dreessen Architects and builds the practice's reputation with innovative infill, institutional, high-tech, and residential projects.
2015: Farrow Dreessen Architect Inc.
Toon Dreessen becomes president and sole principal of the firm.

ADVOCATING FOR ARCHITECTS


Advocating for the industry is important to us at Architects DCA. Toon Dreessen, President of Architects DCA is a strong voice for a range of issues including supporting local firms, the value of association memberships, the importance of political engagement, and pushing for good design in the face of the procurement model.

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